There are Friends and there is Facebook

https://news.ku.edu/2018/03/06/study-reveals-number-hours-it-takes-make-friend

How to make friends? Study reveals time it takes

“Wishing to be friends is quick work, but friendship is a slow ripening fruit.”
– Aristotle

LAWRENCE — Turns out the ancient Greek knew what he was talking about.

In the first study of its kind, a University of Kansas professor has defined the amount of time necessary to make a friend as well as how long it typically takes to move through the deepening stages of friendship.

In a new report published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Associate Professor of Communication Studies Jeffrey Hall found that it takes roughly 50 hours of time together to move from mere acquaintance to casual friend, 90 hours to go from that stage to simple “friend” status and more than 200 hours before you can consider someone your close friend.

This means time spent hanging out, joking around, playing video games and the like. Hours spent working together just don’t count as much, Hall’s study found.

“We have to put that time in,” Hall said. “You can’t snap your fingers and make a friend. Maintaining close relationships is the most important work we do in our lives — most people on their deathbeds agree.”

Hall and a colleague developed an online tool where, based on your answers to a few questions, they guess your friendship closeness.

Hall said he extrapolated his latest work from previous studies that established that a person’s brain can only handle about 150 friendships, and that, as he wrote, “the amount of time and the type of activity shared with a partner can be thought of as strategic investments toward satiating long-term belongingness needs.”

In the first part of his study, Hall analyzed 355 responses to an online survey from adults who said they had moved in the last six months and were looking for new friends in their new homes. Hall asked them to think of someone they had met since moving, and how their relationship had proceeded, drawing associations between friendship closeness, hours spent together and types of activities. In this study, Hall asked the participants to rate their resulting relationships in one of four deepening stages: acquaintance, casual friend, friend and close friend. Then he estimated the number of hours where people began to transition from one level of friendship to another.

Hall’s second study reinforced the conclusions of the first. In it, Hall surveyed 112 KU freshmen who had recently moved to Lawrence. He asked them about two people they had met since starting school two weeks before. Then he followed up with the respondents four and seven weeks later to see how that relationship had progressed.

Combining the results of both studies, he estimated it takes between 40 and 60 hours to form a casual friendship, 80-100 hours to transition to being a friend and more than 200 hours together to become good friends.

When young people fall for each other, they fall hard, Hall said.

“When people transition between stages, they’ll double or triple the amount of time they spend with that other person in three weeks’ time,” he said. “I found freshmen who spent one-third of all waking hours in a month with one good friend.”

Of course, it’s not simply a matter of wanting to be friends with someone. They have to want it, too. And younger people would be wise to make that investment of time, Hall said. He points to previous studies associating early friendships with happiness later in life.

“You can’t make people spend time with you, but you can invite them,” Hall said. “Make it a priority to spend time with potential friends. If you are interested in a friendship, switch up the context. If you work together, go to lunch or out for a drink. These things signal to people that you are interested in being friends with them.”

Credit: Pexels.com

The University of Kansas is a major comprehensive research and teaching university. The university’s mission is to lift students and society by educating leaders, building healthy communities and making discoveries that change the world. The KU News Service is the central public relations office for the Lawrence campus.

kunews@ku.edu | 1450 Jayhawk Blvd., Suite 37, Lawrence, KS 66045

Advertisements

ARTE e gelato:Per fare tutto ci vuole un fiore!

2018-03-09 09.58.06

Gelato e Arte alla Gelateria Sharbe’ di Imperia Oneglia

La Gelateria Sharbe’ si adibisce nuovamente a spazio alternativo ai circuiti d’arte con l’installazione di Claudia Borgna intitolata: Per fare tutto ci vuole un fiore! in mostra per tutta l’estate in Via Genesys 5, Imperia, Italy

Apertura al pubblico tutti i giorni:

Mattino: 11-13

Pomeriggio: 16-22

Screen Shot 2018-07-16 at 15.00.04

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Nell’estate 2016 s’ inaugurava questa prima collaborazione tra Arte e Gelato:

 

 

Modern art did not start with patriarch, Duchamp but with a matriarch!

Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

"Everything emotional in America becomes a mere show and make-believe. Americans are trained to invest money, are said to take even desperate chances on that, yet never do they invest [in] beauty nor take desperate chances on that. With money they try to buy beauty - after it has died - famishing - with grimace. Beauty is ever dead in America."

Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

https://www.theartstory.org/artist-von-freytag-loringhoven-elsa.htm

https://www.lib.umd.edu/dcr/collections/EvFL-class/bios.html

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, the Baroness as she was known, became a living legend in the bohemian enclave of New York City’s Greenwich Village in the years before and after World War I. A provocateur and essential catalyst for New York’s burgeoning Dada movement, the Baroness obliterated the boundaries of conventional norms of womanhood and femininity and upended notions of what was considered art.

Along with the infamous French artist Marcel Duchamp, she pioneered the use of the readymade, and she stretched and manipulated the English language to create avant-garde poetry. Her penchant for cross-dressing and incorporating found objects into her wardrobe made going out in public a daily Dada performance. The Baroness was a radical proto-feminist who critiqued patriarchal norms but was largely overshadowed by her male colleagues. Her daringness was largely ascribed to female eccentricity, and she became a footnote in the annals of New York Dada. It has only been recently that her contributions to the avant-garde have been recognized for their innovativeness.

Key Ideas

Steeped in avant-garde principles and strategies, Freytag-Loringhoven’s work questions the very nature of what society considers art. The Baroness’ use of the “readymade”, a found object presented as a work of art, demands that the viewer consider the divide between high and low culture, utilitarian, everyday objects and fine art, and the role of the artist not as original creator but as appropriator. Her readymades and assemblages disrupt standard notions of beauty. Furthermore, the ephemeral nature of so much of the Baroness’ work deeply embodies Dada’s lacerating critique of the commodification of art objects, perhaps more so than Duchamp’s “readymades,” which were embraced by the very institutions they meant to undermind.
The Baroness took the idea of the “New Woman,” the image of the independent modern woman popularized at the end of the 19th century, to new heights with her rabid insistence on intellectual, artistic, and sexual autonomy. Her eccentric dress and unapologetic use of her body, both as a model and a performance artist, set her apart from her male Dada colleagues.
“To attribute Fountain to a woman and not a man has obvious, far-reaching consequences: the history of modern art has to be rewritten. Modern art did not start with a patriarch, but with a matriarch. What power structure in the world of modern art prohibits this truth to become more widely known and generally accepted? Ultimately this is one of the larger questions looming behind the authorship of Fountain. It sheds light on the place and role of the female artist in the world of modern art.”

I love Trade School

Trade School is a non-traditional learning community that runs on barter. We celebrate local wisdom, mutual respect, and the social nature of exchange. It works like this…

1) People offer to teach a class about something they know.

2) They decide on a list of barter items they’re interested in receiving. Barter items can be in the form of goods or services, both tangible and intangible. For example: jars, music tips, clothes, vegetables, or help with something like finding an apartment.

3) Students sign up for their class by agreeing to bring something from their list.

http://tradeschool.coop/

https://www.eventbrite.com/o/trade-school-los-angeles-17287459016

The New School:

http://rhizome.org/editorial/2010/jan/20/interview-with-caroline-woolard-of-ourgoods/

The Guardian

https://www.theguardian.com/social-care-network/2012/sep/03/work-practices-careers-advice

The Herald:

http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/13071263.An_apple_____or_even_a_mangle_____for_the_teacher_in_new_school/

The New York Post:

https://nypost.com/2010/04/26/trade-balance/